The Key

Dino and that unknown document from The Key

Photo credit: Ferrari, Wheelsage

Alfredo – nicknamed Alfredino or Dino – Ferrari was just 24 years old when he passed away in June 1956. A relentless form of muscular dystrophy took away Enzo’s first son who had demonstrated, with a brilliant degree in engineering, an innate and superb talent. In last year’s TCCT yearbook, The Key 2019, we wrote about an extraordinary and relatively unknown story: a few months before died, Dino had written an article for the Italian magazine Velocità. The subject of the article was Formula 1 engines. It is no coincidence when you consider that the 65° V6 that took his name was the result of a fortuitous suggestion of his. Reading his article from many years ago, it’s clear just how much Formula 1 – and the engines they use – have changed. Dino, bravely, spoke of direct fuel injection when carburettors were the preferred choice – but back then electronics weren’t up to the task – as well as engine downsizing.

The page of “Velocità” discovered in the archives of The Key, in which Dino wrote this piece on F1 engines, just a few weeks before his untimely death

Ferrari had just won two World Titles with Alberto Ascari in a 4-cylinder single-seater. Phenomenal torque but it was difficult to get it to rev high. He suggested following the original Maranello path of the V12’s and, for the smaller engines, the V6. All very interesting. Worthy of the successor Enzo would have wanted. These were the years when the Ferrari legend was in the making. A legend that endures to this day and, just like all legends, must be kept alive. The name Dino and the many road, sports and single-seater cars that have taken his name do just that.

The name Dino will be forever associated with the small GT from Maranello. It should be noted that the car was not a Ferrari but carried the Dino brand, as can also be seen from the wheel centre caps
Dino Ferrari, left, together with his father Enzo and two technicians observes the assembly of one of the famous Ferrari engines during those years in which he sensed the opportunity for a small V6. It was to be the engine that took his name and during the course of its very long life, equipped some 26 different car models: 9 GTs, 7 Sport/Prototypes and 10 single-seaters
The American Phil Hill, World Champion in 1961, behind the wheel of the 156 F1, powered by one of the numerous evolutions of the Dino engine, on the famous Karussell at the Nürburgring
The beautiful Dino 206 S that was made available for privateer teams and was inspired by the shape of the magnificent 330P3
More than 10 years have passed since the debut of the Dino engine, when Andrea De Adamich conquered success in Temporada Argentina, the last important victory of this engine
Virtually no-one would be able to recognize all the Dinos produced but everyone recognizes the road-going model, which has become part of the Ferrari legend